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9.2. Mounting a File System

Before you can mount a GFS file system, the file system must exist (refer to Section 9.1 Making a File System), the pool volume where the file system exists must be activated, and the supporting clustering and locking systems must be started (refer to Chapter 4 Initial Configuration). After those requirements have been met, you can mount the GFS file system as you would any Linux file system.

To manipulate file ACLs, you must mount the file system with the -o acl mount option. If a file system is mounted without the -o acl mount option, users are allowed to view ACLs (with getfacl), but are not allowed to set them (with setfacl).

9.2.1. Usage

Mounting Without ACL Manipulation

mount -t gfs BlockDevice MountPoint

Mounting With ACL Manipulation

mount -t gfs -o acl BlockDevice MountPoint

-o acl

GFS-specific option to allow manipulating file ACLs.

BlockDevice

Specifies the block device where the GFS file system resides.

MountPoint

Specifies the directory where the GFS file system should be mounted.

9.2.2. Example

In this example, the GFS file system on the pool0 block device is mounted on the /gfs1/ directory.

mount -t gfs /dev/pool/pool0 /gfs1

9.2.3. Complete Usage

mount -t gfs BlockDevice MountPoint -o option

The -o option consists of GFS-specific options (refer to Table 9-2) or acceptable standard Linux mount -o options, or a combination of both. Multiple option parameters are separated by a comma and no spaces.

NoteNote
 

The mount command is a Linux system command. In addition to using GFS-specific options described in this section, you can use other, standard, mount command options (for example, -r). For information about other Linux mount command options, see the Linux mount man page.

Table 9-2 describes the available GFS-specific options that can be passed to GFS at mount time.

OptionDescription
-o aclAllows manipulating file ACLs. If a file system is mounted without the -o acl mount option, users are allowed to view ACLs (with getfacl), but are not allowed to set them (with setfacl).
hostdata=nodenameLOCK_GULM file systems use this information to set the local node name, overriding the usual selection of node name from uname -n.
lockproto=LockModuleNameAllows the user to specify which locking protocol to use with the file system. If LockModuleName is not specified, the locking protocol name is read from the file system superblock.
locktable=LockTableNameAllows the user to specify which locking table to use with the file system.
upgradeUpgrade the on-disk format of the file system so that it can be used by newer versions of GFS.

ignore_local_fs
Caution: This option should not be used when GFS file systems are shared.

Forces GFS to treat the file system as a multihost file system. By default, using LOCK_NOLOCK automatically turns on the localcaching and localflocks flags.

localcaching
Caution: This option should not be used when GFS file systems are shared.

Tells GFS that it is running as a local file system. GFS can then turn on selected optimization capabilities that are not available when running in cluster mode. The localcaching flag is automatically turned on by LOCK_NOLOCK.

localflocks
Caution: This option should not be used when GFS file systems are shared.

Tells GFS to let the VFS (virtual file system) layer do all flock and fcntl. The localflocks flag is automatically turned on by LOCK_NOLOCK.

Table 9-2. GFS-Specific Mount Options